bookoisseur
ultracheese:

laughterkey:

derelictjet:

mindofgemini:

goldist:

malformalady:

The Black Dragonfish(Idiacanthus atlanticus) of the Stomiidae family.

I love how this is like a creature from hell but it has like little pink cheeks 

deep sea anime blush stickers


fun fact those pink cheeks glow to attract unsuspecting prey
fashionable and functional with a dash of abject terror

My aesthetic.

Perhaps senpai will notice me SO I CAN CONSUME HIS FLESH

ultracheese:

laughterkey:

derelictjet:

mindofgemini:

goldist:

malformalady:

The Black Dragonfish(Idiacanthus atlanticus) of the Stomiidae family.

I love how this is like a creature from hell but it has like little pink cheeks 

deep sea anime blush stickers

fun fact those pink cheeks glow to attract unsuspecting prey

fashionable and functional with a dash of abject terror

My aesthetic.

Perhaps senpai will notice me SO I CAN CONSUME HIS FLESH

asianamericanfilmlab
pag-asaharibon:

Amazons of the Huk Rebellion: Gender, Sex, and Revolution in the Philippines

Labeled “Amazons” by the national press, women played a central role in the Huk rebellion, one of the most significant peasant-based revolutions in modern Philippine history.  As spies, organizers, nurses, couriers, soldiers, and even military commanders, women worked closely with men to resist first Japanese occupation and later, after WWII, to challenge the new Philippine republic. But in the midst of the uncertainty and violence of rebellion, these women also pursued personal lives, falling in love, becoming pregnant, and raising families, often with their male comrades-in-arms.
Drawing on interviews with over one hundred veterans of the movement, Vina A. Lanzona explores the Huk rebellion from the intimate and collective experiences of its female participants, demonstrating how their presence, and the complex questions of gender, family, and sexuality they provoked, ultimately shaped the nature of the revolutionary struggle.
Vina A. Lanzona is associate professor of history at the University of Hawai’i–Manoa.

pag-asaharibon:

Amazons of the Huk Rebellion: Gender, Sex, and Revolution in the Philippines

Labeled “Amazons” by the national press, women played a central role in the Huk rebellion, one of the most significant peasant-based revolutions in modern Philippine history.  As spies, organizers, nurses, couriers, soldiers, and even military commanders, women worked closely with men to resist first Japanese occupation and later, after WWII, to challenge the new Philippine republic. But in the midst of the uncertainty and violence of rebellion, these women also pursued personal lives, falling in love, becoming pregnant, and raising families, often with their male comrades-in-arms.

Drawing on interviews with over one hundred veterans of the movement, Vina A. Lanzona explores the Huk rebellion from the intimate and collective experiences of its female participants, demonstrating how their presence, and the complex questions of gender, family, and sexuality they provoked, ultimately shaped the nature of the revolutionary struggle.

Vina A. Lanzona is associate professor of history at the University of Hawai’i–Manoa.

kchayka
natashavc:

People do all sorts of wish fulfillment on this thing, yeah? Like posting pictures of celebs we’d like to get raunched out with or GIFs of highly paid actresses that we say, ‘this is me right now’. So here goes, this is my wish fulfillment because I am putting off work.
My wish* is that I could get bombed out in an opium den and take a nap for 3 hours and stroke a cat under flattering moon-y lighting.
*there’s a pre-wish here, that opium wasn’t, like, horribly ravishingly addictive and that i did not have a certain pre-disposition for compulsion, addiction and really spectacular self destruction which remains a constant threat that requires a lot of ‘processing’ and a lot of cringing at things said and done the stupor of a pharmacological trance and a wounded ego. under these caveats I would go to that fucking opium den like it was my gym. my green juice in a jade pipe. never thinking, stroking some mammal. maybe getting felt up and kissed a bit. just like a warm, oblivion inducing whitney houston bath that never ends.

natashavc:

People do all sorts of wish fulfillment on this thing, yeah? Like posting pictures of celebs we’d like to get raunched out with or GIFs of highly paid actresses that we say, ‘this is me right now’. So here goes, this is my wish fulfillment because I am putting off work.

My wish* is that I could get bombed out in an opium den and take a nap for 3 hours and stroke a cat under flattering moon-y lighting.

*there’s a pre-wish here, that opium wasn’t, like, horribly ravishingly addictive and that i did not have a certain pre-disposition for compulsion, addiction and really spectacular self destruction which remains a constant threat that requires a lot of ‘processing’ and a lot of cringing at things said and done the stupor of a pharmacological trance and a wounded ego. under these caveats I would go to that fucking opium den like it was my gym. my green juice in a jade pipe. never thinking, stroking some mammal. maybe getting felt up and kissed a bit. just like a warm, oblivion inducing whitney houston bath that never ends.

buzz
But when Thiel is arguing for more women founders he isn’t just deflecting responsibility from himself and his fellow investors. He is also doing something else that I want to unpack: he is re-inscribing a form of hierarchical thinking that is part of the reason tech is such a mess regarding diversity. That is, when Thiel points to “more women founders” as a solution, he is asking women to become founders in order to possess a status that would allow Thiel to acknowledge women in tech at all.

The Myth of Magical Futures

I think this is a perceptive criticism. In the world of startups, there are really two categories of people: the exalted class of “founders” (whose economics, perks, and acclaim are disproportionate to the rank and file), and everyone else. Both a large hierarchal imbalance and a club-ish lack of transparency lie at the heart of this industry whose PR story leans heavily on an image of progressive meritocracy.

(via buzz)

Damn, Kate Losse. Damn.

annfriedman

The Unbearable Whiteness